Rating Every Park In Vancouver: #210-201

#210: Jean Beaty Park

“Nice view of the city.”

#17 in Kitsilano

3993 Point Grey Road

For Kids

D-



For Adults

D+



Design

D+



Atmosphere

C



Final Score

13.00


Along Point Grey Road, Vancouver has a number of small waterfront parks, all of which have wonderful views, all of which used to have homes on them.

The westernmost one was also the last to be created — Jean Beaty Park, named for the homeowner who sold the land to the Park Board for far below market value. 

Today the homes on either side are valued at $11 and $13 million, but the park itself is a little smaller than the other waterfront pocket parks, with two paths limiting the amount of green space.

But if you live within a couple blocks and want a serene view, you’ll have no complaints. 

#209: Montgomery Park

“Grass soaks up rain and does not drain well.”

#5 in Oakridge

1040 West 43rd Avenue

For Kids

B



For Adults

D



Design

D



Atmosphere

D-



Final Score

13.20


In a city with so many large sports fields, Montgomery Park is the worst. 

The never-ending expanse of unmarked green space is interrupted only by small old baseball diamonds, with a sad small collection of trees on the far east side. The grass is choppy and the drainage is poor, benches are minimal and the space feels underused outside of large sports tournaments. 

Thankfully, the park board agrees, which is why they approved a $2 million upgrade to improve the fields, upgrade the seating and make the field layouts more flexible. 

When that construction is finished, it will be a park worth visiting — especially considering the playground next to the elementary school has three structures perfectly acceptable for 5-12 years olds. 

At present, it’s the most disappointing large park in the city. 

#208: Triangle Park

#13 in Mount Pleasant

151 Athletes Way

For Kids

D-



For Adults

D+



Design

C-



Atmosphere

C-



Final Score

13.25


The waterfront path along Olympic Village between Science World and Hinge Park is one of those places you would take people to if you wanted to explain modern Vancouver — a collection of immaculately designed public spaces and waterfront views and separated pedestrian and cycling paths that seems utopian so long as you don’t ponder the economics of it all. 

In the middle of that is a weird sliver of land that’s technically a park. Called “Triangle” in the planning stages and in databases but never publicly named, there are two long undulating benches (with overhanging structures that could be covered to protect from the rain but aren’t), surrounded by a bit of grass.

A fine space to enjoy a bite to eat, but another area where one wonders why it’s technically a park. 

#207: Arbutus Park

“Blaaaaa plain jane dead grass.”

#9 in Kerrisdale

7601 Arbutus Street

For Kids

D-



For Adults

C-



Design

D



Atmosphere

D



Final Score

13.46


Donated in 1958 by George Kidd, former president of BC Electric Company, this park provides a large expanse of trees (mostly of the willow and oak variety) on a mid-sized parcel of grass. 

Like many west side parks, if you live nearby it’s okay for a picnic, but it’s location next to Southwest Marine Drive makes it fairly noisy. 

If that doesn’t sound exciting, that’s because it isn’t. But undeveloped triangle parks are a beacon of this city, and this is certainly one of them. 

#206: Commissioner Park

“Not much of a park but a nice spot to sit on a bench.”

#19 in Hastings-Sunrise

2709 Wall Street

For Kids

D-



For Adults

D+



Design

D+



Atmosphere

C



Final Score

13.50


As the west side of Vancouver has the Point Grey miniparks, the east side has the Wall Street ones — little pockets of land that used to be homes, and are small waterfront green spaces for the enjoyment of the public, assuming your enjoyment is mostly derived from quietly enjoying the view.

This one, just off Slocan Street, is the least essential, owing mostly to the fact that hedges and trees block 80% of the view, only providing tiny slivers of the north shore mountains in the distance. 

#205: Angus Park

“Usually completely empty, occasionally graced by a rich local from one of the nearby mansions, walking their untrained purebred bored and stressed out dog.”

#5 in Shaughnessy

3600 Angus Drive

For Kids

D



For Adults

D



Design

D



Atmosphere

D



Final Score

13.60


Another west side neighbourhood with another unremarkable triangle park, Angus is named for a Canadian Pacific Railway Director who never lived in Vancouver — which was common for much of the surrounding Shaughnessy neighbourhood, created by the railway company in the early 20th century. 

There are a number of interesting trees (including a Chinese Fir and Swamp Cypress), and enough space that the neighbourhood dogs can frolic freely even if it’s not technically an off-leash area.

But would one come here if they didn’t live in Shaugnessy? No, they would not. 

#204: Minipark @ Cardero & Comox

#8 in West End


For Kids

D-



For Adults

D



Design

C-



Atmosphere

C-



Final Score

13.63


The best of the West End miniparks is objectively (if such a word can be used for this exercise) at Cardero and Comox, and this statement can be made for a number of reasons.

For one, it’s across the street from Lord Roberts Field and the adjoining elementary school, giving the space a less cramped field, and something to stare at more than just houses. 

For another, there is easily more benches and tables than the other miniparks, making it more inviting to sit and let the time go by. 

It used to be home to the Cardero Grocery corner store as well, but has been in development limbo for several years. Current plans involve new rental units and a new grocery store, which one hopes would make a decent minipark that much better. 

#203: Hastings Community Park

“Not a good park at all.”

#18 in Hastings-Sunrise

3000 East Pender Street

For Kids

D+



For Adults

C-



Design

D



Atmosphere

D+



Final Score

13.67


There are a number of things you can do at the park surrounding Hastings Community Centre, from basketball to tennis to having a picnic in the flat area surrounded by trees. One of the baseball diamonds is of tournament-quality, and provides views of Playland across the street.

But the overall feel of the park is of a disjointed place (common to many parks with a community centre right in the middle, the outside amenities designed in a haphazard fashion), of a loud place (due to cars roaring on Hastings Street as they make their way to Highway 1), and of an annex to Hastings Park next door. 

In other words, the problems that plague the park aren’t exactly fixable, but it still serves its purpose for people living nearby adequately enough.

#202: Shaughnessy Park

“I sometimes amuse myself by imagining that the bloated plutocrats would all simultaneously emerge from the surrounding mansion-cum-palaces ( dressed in top hat and morning suits, like that jolly little fellow from the Monopoly game) to engage in an impromptu game of ‘Gurkha Football’ – no field boundaries, goal posts or referees, their only notion of the game being to kick the ball as hard as ever they could and then run after it laughing like madmen and shouting ‘footba’ !'”

this eventuality is unlikely to occur, but I think that the world would be a little bit nicer if it did.”

#4 in Shaughnessy

1300 The Crescent

For Kids

D



For Adults

D+



Design

C-



Atmosphere

D+



Final Score

13.75


If you were an alien studying Vancouver from afar, you might think Shaughnessy Park would be amazing.  

After all, it’s a park right in the middle of the wealthiest neighbourhood in Vancouver. It’a large circle, in a centrally-planned area built 110 years ago, with all roads in the community leading towards it. Surely, the park would evoke a grand experience teeming with people. 

And yet. 

The circle has a small dirt path through it. It’s home to a variety of trees, common and rare, that are too plentiful to make games of sport possible, but too few to create a true forested experience. It has no washrooms, and no amenities of any kind.

Of course, all neighbourhoods in Vancouver have these sorts of green spaces. But Shaughnessy is the only one of the city’s 22 neighbourhoods where a majority of its parks have zero amenities. 

“The Crescent”, as it was known originally, in the early days of Vancouver and Shaughnessy. Courtesy Vancouver Archives

Why? The obvious answer is that virtually every resident lives in a large single-family home with an expansive backyard. As a result, dynamic parks have rarely been needed or requested, especially compared to neighbourhoods like Mount Pleasant or Kitsilano. 

At the same time, Shaughnessy’s population has slowly diminished and gotten older over the last 25 years, further reducing community demand for new amenities. 

So if all you need is a bench to watch the trees, or a space to walk your dog, then Shaughnessy Park does just fine. 

It’s a symbolic park. But the symbols may be different depending on who you are.  

#201: Portside View Park

“There’s no Portside View so the title is pretty misleading.”

1/11 in Kensington-Cedar Cottage

2597 Wall Street

For Kids

D-



For Adults

D+



Design

C-



Atmosphere

C-



Final Score

13.85


Technically this park doesn’t have a name — the city just calls it “Park Site on Kamloops” as part of the group of Wall Street Parks. 

(Sidenote: at one point in the 1970s, the city had a fund to improve the Wall Street Parks, but at a certain point they diverted the funds to the Kerrisdale Lawn Bowling Club, which became a symbol of the city providing more to the west side than the east) 

Anyways, this one has been named on Google as Portside View, owing to its location right across from part of Vancouver’s expansive port. 

And yet, the view is often ironically blocked by thick hedges, making it less satisfactory. The park has enough space to picnic or play some bocce, making it not a total loss, portside view or not. 

Next: Parks #200-191

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