Rating Every Park In Vancouver: #200-191

#200: Seaforth Peace Park

“very noisy. Not the best location for a park.”

#16 in Kitsilano

1620 Chesnut Street

For Kids

D-



For Adults

C



Design

C-



Atmosphere

D+



Final Score

14.17


A fairly small strip of land right in front of the Seaforth Armoury where it gets half its name, the “peace” part can refer both to the memorial fountain that commemorates the bombing of Hiroshima, a group of peace trees planted in the 1980s, or the number of large peace rallies that would often start here, a staging ground before crossing the Burrard Street Bridge. 

All interesting history, and there’s a few interesting sculptures to look at, but as a park it’s incredibly noisy given its proximity to the bridge, with no amenities for kids and not enough space to do much but have lunch. 

But it’s definitely the only park in Vancouver that has an engraved recipe for soup. 

#199: Portal Park

“It’s a place where business people working in the downtown core smoke and chill briefly.”

#20 in Downtown

1099 West Hastings Street

For Kids

F



For Adults

D+



Design

C



Atmosphere

C



Final Score

14.33


When it opened in 1987 “primarily for downtown office people” as the Vancouver Sun put it, you could still see the mountains and Lions Gate Bridge from this small park, but in the intervening decades towers and convention centres have blocked the view.

What remains is a little piece of Expo-era architecture, curved canopies and inaccessible paths, a perfectly average place to have that lunch away from the desk but little else, the picture of a globe in the middle a sign of the city’s worldly ambition in the 1980s, the politics of the park being a product of a land swap with a developer, long forgotten.

Portal Park under construction in the mid 1980s (Courtesy Vancouver Archives)

#198: Braemar Park

“Just a field.”

#4 in South Cambie

895 West 27th Avenue

For Kids

D-



For Adults

C-



Design

D+



Atmosphere

C-



Final Score

14.50


Some of the city’s parks seem like the city ran out of money halfway through the process, and this field just north of BC Children’s Hospital is a textbook example of that. 

A field house with washrooms and large lights for evening rugby and baseball provide plenty of potential, as do the grand trees that border the park’s north side.

But no benches, no changes in the topography and no amenities for kids make it underwhelming for any use other than sport, or a short reprieve from a hospital stay. 

It serves its purpose adequately enough — until you consider that Douglas Park is just four blocks north. 

#197: Gordon Park

“Crowded. Weed infested. No great vistas.”

#7 in Victoria-Fraserview

6675 Commercial Street

For Kids

C



For Adults

D



Design

D-



Atmosphere

D



Final Score

14.63


If one wanted to make a case that Vancouver gives less attention to the south side of the city when it comes to amenities, you could start at Gordon.

The park is one of the 30 biggest in the city, a huge expanse of land comprising eight full city blocks, the only park of any significant size for more than a kilometre. 

And yet, for all that space, there is a small field house, an unimaginative playground from the 1980s, and endless fields. Lots and lots of fields. 

No real delineation between the fields, mind you, or interesting seating, or separation in the middle where people can have a proper picnic. Just a bunch of space for a baseball or soccer tournament, taking up more space than necessary, existing in an awkward void. 

Which is all well and good! Goodness knows that green space for sports is needed — but when it’s done in a way that excludes anything else, in an era where parks have become much more multi-faceted — see the north side of the city — it’s a big disappointment. 

And lest you think that Gordon has some stronger lineage — the park board didn’t bother to mention it in its 1972 book describing virtually every park in the city. Pictures are nowhere to be found in the city’s online archives. Newspapers rarely mention it outside of event listings. 

In short, it may be the least interesting park, acre per acre, in the city. And that most of these types of parks are in the southern end of the city may or may not be a coincidence. 

#196: Kerrisdale Park

“This ‘park’ is next to a school.”

#3 in Shaughnessy

5670 East Boulevard

For Kids

D-



For Adults

D+



Design

D+



Atmosphere

D+



Final Score

14.67


Another plot of land next to a school that exists mostly for the purpose of excess green space,  fromKerrisdale Park you can see the Cyclone Taylor Arena and Point Grey Secondary School, both of which teem with heritage. You can also see an excellent track facility belonging to the school, and you’re just a stone’s throw from 41st Avenue and the heart of Kerrisdale,

In Kerrisdale Park itself, though? Well, you can play baseball. And you can watch people play baseball. And if you head to the park’s far east side you can get up on a hill and enjoy some shade, whether or not you’re watching baseball. 

There’s a whole discussion of Vancouver’s growth coinciding with baseball being the biggest sport in America, and how that may have influenced our baseball-rich but basketball-poor park architecture throughout the city, but that’s for another time. 

#195: Grimmett Park

“It’s a children’s park and less of an actual park park.”

#8 in Riley Park

169 East 19th Avenue

For Kids

C



For Adults

D



Design

C-



Atmosphere

D+



Final Score

14.88


For a park that neighbourhood residents fought to make reality in the 1990s — it was land donated by a citizen explicitly for a park, but for decades was 95% concrete and a private lawn bowling club — Grimmett is surprisingly sparse. 

A rudimentary playground sits next to a) a tiny hill, b) a mysterious cement holding pen too small for ball hockey, and c) a patch of grass too small for sports, but too close to the road to allow real serenity.

It’s fine enough for the community. Unless you live mere blocks away though, seek refuge elsewhere.

#194: Cambridge Park

“Can’t really say only walked by lots sorry.”

#15 in Grandview-Woodland

2099 Wall Street

For Kids

D+



For Adults

C-



Design

D+



Atmosphere

D+



Final Score

15.00


The westernmost of the Wall Street parks, Cambridge offers a long strip of grass with some trees in the middle. There’s also a small community garden and library in the north end. It provides decent views of the port, but the park is pitched at an angle where there are better views to be had in better parks. 

Still, for a long stretch of grass where a dog can roam, Cambridge will fit the bill. 

#193: Helmcken Park

“More of a shady pathway.”

#19 in Downtown

1103 Pacific Boulevard

For Kids

F



For Adults

D



Design

C



Atmosphere

B-



Final Score

15.17


A small walking path that connects the main Yaletown area with Pacific Boulevard, Helmcken Park serves as a reminder that generations of British Columbians have been confused by the lack of an “e” between the “m” and “c” in countless things named for John Sebastian Helmcken, one of the most influential leaders in the colonizing of British Columbia, partly because it married James Douglas’ daughter. 

What’s that? Oh right, the park. It provides some benches and shade, but otherwise is tremendously underutilized, including a large fountain that former city planner Brian Jackson called “an over-thought piece of junk.”

#192: Shannon Park

“Ok.”

#9 in Oakridge

1575 West 62nd Avenue

For Kids

D



For Adults

C-



Design

C-



Atmosphere

D+



Final Score

15.30


The city describes the birch trees that surround this small park as “majestic”, which is fairly generous. But it’s another field next to a school — in this case, the Vancouver Hebrew Academy — that’s meant for baseball and soccer, and little else.

A basketball court and small playground are right beside the park, but fenced off, but the park provides adequate space for people living in the 62nd Avenue and Granville area, even if one or two extra amenities would go a long way.

#191: Pigeon Park

“Not a good park in any way at all.”

#18 in Downtown

399 Carall Street

For Kids

F



For Adults

D-



Design

C



Atmosphere

B+



Final Score

15.33


In 1968, in a story on Vancouver’s “skid row”, a reporter for The Province described Pigeon Park as “loaded with drunks” and “dangerous now for women and children to walk through.” 

“A dreary panorama of human misery,” declared a Vancouver Sun reporter in 1970. 

“Do away with it” declared reporter Harvey Oberfeld in 1972, saying that the park had “gone straight downhill” since the very day it was created by the city in 1938, saying “let’s face it, the battle for Pigeon Park has been lost.”  

Well, it’s still here. So are the folks who carve out space for themselves in a little triangle of land at Carall and Hastings. After a multi-year political skirmish that saw “Pioneer Place” transferred over to the park board in the 1970s, Pigeon Park — named for the birds that frequent it — has continued to be a place where the most marginalized in the Downtown Eastside have a little more outside space than just a sidewalk.  

It is far from perfect or ideal for anyone, and many of the adjectives used in the 60s and 70s could be used today, if you were so inclined.

But it’s a well-used park by those who perhaps need it the most. 

Pigeon Park as it looked in the 1960s (Courtesy Vancouver Archives).

Next: Parks #190-181

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