Rating Every Park In Vancouver: #20-11

#20: Hinge Park

“Innovative park with nature, fields, playground water feature and dog park all in one small area.”

#2 in Mount Pleasant

215 West 1st Avenue

For Kids

B+



For Adults

B-



Design

A-



Atmosphere

B+



Final Score

30.50


For a park barely a decade old, Hinge sure feels timeless. 

Part of that comes from the little touches of history in the park, namely the rusty submarine-looking bridge that crosses a creek and the railway ties at its southern end. 

Part of that comes from the wetland that takes up the southwest portion of the park — someone new to the city would scarcely believe it was barely a decade old, with the beavers and waterfowl that make their home in the area. 

Part of it comes from how lived-in the park feels, even though it was an industrial area transformed as part of the Olympic Village development: it’s incredibly popular for the thousands of people who live in the neighbourhood and don’t have a larger nearby park, so it ends up serving a lot of different needs. 

And part of it comes from the sense of exploration the park affords: there are all sorts of little hills and rock circles and walkways over the wetland that give the sense of multiple options for getting to know the park.

It can not be emphasized enough how both gimmicky and wonderful the weird submarine tunnel is.

Oh right: there’s a dog park, and a playground with swings and climbing structures, and a big field with a gorgeous view of downtown Vancouver, all in a relatively small area. 

All of this helps explain why the park has been featured in plenty of websites and presentations focusing on urbanism and modern park design: it’s the most recent large park created by the city, one with a big $7 million budget, and they arguably made the most of it. 

One can nitpick. The structured play area is quite small (though the long water pump makes up for it when it’s open), there are much better dog areas and community gardens in other parks, and the main field area is scheduled to turn into an elementary school — while definitely needed, it will put a further stress on large accessible green space in the area. 

But a quick look at Hinge on virtually any day of the week, at any time, will see a bustling park of families and young adults, tourists and locals. And there’s not much more you can ask for.  

#19: Habitat Island

“Best place for a beer with some great views and usually some really cool people hanging around too.”

#1 in Mount Pleasant

1616 Columbia Street

For Kids

B-



For Adults

B+



Design

A



Atmosphere

A+



Final Score

30.96


19 short notes on Vancouver’s 19th best park.

  1. Yes, Habitat Island is its real name. Not “Beer Island”. 
  2. Why is it called Beer Island? Well, it’s a man-made island (technically a peninsula where you have to cross), and people like to drink there. 
  3. People like to drink pretty much anywhere, of course. But Habitat Island is a relatively secluded waterfront area with many places you can sit, in an area highly populated with childless Millennials, so you do the math. 
  4. Overall, the reputation of it as “Beer Island” is overblown — on any day you’ll see a few people quietly imbibing somewhere on the island or rocks surrounding it, but more people just enjoying the view,
  5. And the mystique of Beer Island takes away from the park’s actual backstory, which is plenty fun itself: the federal government required the city to create more shoreline when it took some away to create Olympic Village. An island was certainly one way to create a lot of shoreline in a concentrated area. 
  6. As the story goes, it was created from 60,000 metres of rock and gravel and sand from related Olympic construction.
  7. They also planted 246 trees
  8. And 20,929 shrubs.
  9. They also added a few little trails that go nowhere, and there’s enough big rocks and little bushes that it’s a fun area to explore for small kids.
  10. There used to be more trees and foliage before — that was probably more fun for people clandestinely drinking, but likely makes it a little more safe overall.

11. The ebb and flow of the rocks surrounding the island provides fun variety (and additional hangout spaces at low tide)
12. The legend is the park architects wanted to make it a true island at high tide, but it was nixed because of obvious safety concerns. It still happens from time to time though, and it is delightful.
13. This park is right next to Hinge Park, both in location and in ranking — we don’t know why they aren’t considered the same park, but obviously it would be a top 10 park if that were the case.
14. The level of detail and possibilities in a small space really is impressive
15. It’s also objectively ridiculous such a fanciful place exists right in the heart of Vancouver, with so many iconic views — to the east is Science World, to the west is English Bay, straight ahead is BC Place, and they’re all completely unobstructed.
16. Two of the people in our ranking team put Habitat Park in their top 5 — most others had it closer to their 30th-40th best park in the city.
17. Were those two people the most likely to indulge in the nickname of the park? Who can say yes.
18. No matter who you are, this is a fun park, a unique park, one of those parks that is neat to bring a friend from out of town, but pleasant to visit 1-2 times a year regardless.
19. You can give all the backstory you want, argue whether this ranking is too high or too low, but at the end of the day it’s a tiny island right in the middle of False Creek. How cool is that?

#18: English Bay Beach

“It’s packed don’t come here.”

#3 in West End

1700 Beach Avenue

For Kids

C



For Adults

A



Design

B



Atmosphere

A+



Final Score

31.00


Sure, you could describe English Bay Beach, but what would be the point? 

It’s sort of like describing the Eiffel Tower to people in Paris or Parliament Hill to those in Ottawa — it’s the postcard image, the one you’ve seen and experienced again and again, the place where the fireworks happen and the Inukshuk stands, the “fabled front door” of the city as Vancouver Sun writer Robert Sarti one called it. 

There’s the curved beach and adjacent grass, the lovely art deco bathhouse, the way it funnels into Denman and all the frenetic activity of the West End, but how it also eases off into Stanley Park and the residential buildings further to the west. 

It’s old Vancouver, the city’s First Beach, the one you see in all the archival photos and videos, linked to the story of Joe Fortes (the city’s first lifeguard, and one of its few celebrated Black pioneers) and across from the Sylvia Hotel.

But it’s so populated by tourists, and so beloved by people in the West End, that there’s always a vibrant energy to it. 

It’s a great historic beach with atmosphere galore. It’s also, objectively, the least essential of all Vancouver’s major beaches. 

Some of the blame is due to the lack of anything else *within* the beach — yes, it’s well located, but there’s outside those washrooms, there’s no amenities at English Bay, unless you count the relatively thin strip of grass (where there’s competition for real estate with the birds), and the one slide out in the ocean. 

This is nice, but consider the additional things you can do at Kits or Jericho, or the tide at Spanish Banks, or the beach at Third. English Bay suffers. 

And then there’s the crowds, and while it’s fun to feed off that energy of people, it can get a little exhausting in the summertime. In the winter it’s a lovely extended backyard for thousands of West Enders, but that has limited virtue for the rest of us.

Of course, such is the ridiculous nature of Vancouver that what could be the most well known beach internationally, and the one with the most local history, is arguably only the fifth or sixth best sandy space to go in the city, all things being equal. 

Then the point of the postcard shot isn’t to nitpick the details, but to just appreciate that you have it. 

#17: David Lam Park

“The reason I fell head-over-heels in love with Vancouver a decade ago.”

#1 in Downtown

1300 Pacific Boulevard

For Kids

B+



For Adults

A



Design

A-



Atmosphere

B



Final Score

31.01


Let us consider all the ways David Lam works. 

The downtown park is packed with things to do: two play areas for two different age groups of different sides of the park, tennis and basketball courts, public restrooms, and most prominently the large field in the middle, big enough for dozens of small picnics and barbeques and badminton matches to be happening at the same time.

The design is simple but elegant — the big field is surrounded by towers to the west and east, Pacific Boulevard (with an ample transitionatory plaza) to the north, and False Creek to the south. 

The seawall-long cycling/walking path divides the field from the water, while the trees surrounding the sports courts provide some cover and give a little bit of breathing room from the condos. 

There are two pieces of art next to the water, a large fountain to the west side, and a number of places for people to enter or exit the park if they’re not arriving via the seawall. 

It’s the type of modern mix of green space, glass towers and ocean people associate with Vancouverism, the process of transforming industrial waterfront and negotiating with developers for community amenities (in this case, Concord Pacific), but none of it would matter if it felt empty, soulless and detached from the greater community.

Yet David Lam is always busy with something, from small games of soccer to the annual jazz festival, young adults gallivanting and young children playing, Yaletown locals enjoying it as their neighbourhood park and weekend visitors appreciating it as a stop along their Vancouver Semi-Touristy Experience.  

Add in the fact it’s the first park in the city named for an Asian Canadian — Lam immigrated from Hong Kong and went on to become lieutenant-governor — and it’s a park that reflects Vancouver in all its modernity, a park befitting of being called the best in the Downtown core.

Of course, those condos surrounding the park have tripled in value since it opened in the 1990s. But that’s another story about Vancouver’s modernity.

#16: Clark Park

“Fun park, mostly on a hill.”

#2 in Kensingon-Cedar Cottage

1500 East 14th Avenue

For Kids

B



For Adults

A-



Design

A-



Atmosphere

B+



Final Score

31.58


There’s a relaxed vibe to Clark that betrays its history.

As recently documented in Aaron Chapman’s book “The Last Gang in Town”, Clark Park was once the centre of a rougher side of Vancouver (particularly the east side), a time with less organized crime and more disorganized mayhem, when the city was smaller and the stakes were too, but the violence no less real. 

That was the 1960s and 1970s. The east side has gone through successive waves of gentrification, the region’s gang centres have moved eastward, and the main thing Clark Park means to today’s generation is a lovely place to catch the sunset on a blanket with friends or family. 

That sunset — ideally viewed about midway up the giant hill from west to east that dominates the park — is truly lovely, but so are a lot of other things about Clark, just the second park in the city when it was established in 1889. 

There’s the large forested area near the top of the hill, neatly dividing the park from the lower section (soccer field, sandy playground with zip line and giant tires) to the upper section (baseball diamond, woodchip playground with a very inventive wooden climbing structure). There’s also ample seating, a basketball and tennis court, and plenty of different paths one can use to explore the park.

The less manicured grass and plentiful trees in the middle of Clark Park give a natural divide between its two flatter areas.

Perhaps the most impressive thing is that despite being next to both busy Knight Street and Commercial Drive, the design of the park makes it blocks out most of the vehicle noise. 

Clark’s biggest drawback, aside from the lack of a killer app (beach, pool, amazing playground or sports facilities) is there being no washroom, making it the highest rated park in the city without one. 

And if that’s the largest flaw to the park, well, that’s plenty progress. 

#15: VanDusen Botanical Garden

“One of Vancouver’s great jewels.”

#1 in Shaughnessy

5251 Oak Street

For Kids

C



For Adults

A+



Design

A-



Atmosphere

A



Final Score

31.67


The story of how VanDusen came to be is like a lot of stories involving how Vancouver came to be: it involves railway executives and forestry money. 

Most of the middle of the city, you might remember, was given to the CP Railway company in the 1880s in exchange for the railway ending in Vancouver (the idea that Indigenous people might have legal rights to the area barely acknowledged at the time).  

Bit by bit CP Rail developed the land, or leased it to groups like the Shaughnessy Golf Club. But by the 1960s the golf club had decamped to its current position south of UBC, and there was much consternation over how the land would (or should) be developed.

Eventually a compromise was struck: CP Rail would sell the land to Vancouver in exchange for being able to build more houses; the city would then convert the land into a modern garden, with a million dollar donation from MacMillan Bloedel executive Whitford Juilan VanDusen making the numbers line up. 

There’s not exactly a cohesive theme to VanDusen — if you want that, you’re better off going to Sun Yat-Sen or the trails in Stanley Park. Instead, there’s a huge array of different plants, gardens, geographical themes and artwork, all elegantly designed and meticulously maintained. 

It’s all extremely pleasant, though the desire to be all garden things to all garden people can be a bit aesthetically jarring: one moment you’re in the Sino-Himalayan section, then it’s on to the hedge maze, and hey what’s that giant wooden owl doing over there? 

We lightly chide, though the truth is all those different themes means there’s likely at least one part each person will fall in love with, and the prices of $4 to $12 depending on age and time of year is definitely more than fair value — though the replay value for children may be slightly limited; at the end of the day it’s still just a garden, elaborate though it may be. 

It’s sprawling, peaceful, cut off from the rest of the city, and definitely a place worth exploring for an hour or three.

#14: Grandview Park

“Essentially a outdoor community center in the heart of East Van. Great for people watching and experiencing the less homogenous side of Vancouver. Everyone welcome <3.”

#2 in Grandview-Woodland

1255 Commercial Drive

For Kids

A



For Adults

B+



Design

B+



Atmosphere

B+



Final Score

31.68


At the heart of Commercial Drive is a park that beats to the same drum as the neighbourhood: a little bit discordant, but full of heart and intoxicating, authentic energy. 

Right on Commercial Drive, across the street from the Havana restaurant, Grandview is home to East Side Pride, rehearsals for a brass band, the end of the annual Dyke March, the city’s only bike polo court (don’t worry, you can use it for ball hockey), and all sorts of other community events, formal and informal, that enjoy the welcoming space. 

The openness of the park to everyone can cause some tension — the park board did an extensive renovation a decade ago in part to try and reduce open drug use — but overall there’s enough space to fit everyone, and enough space between the cenotaph area where adults gather and the playground at the bottom of the hill to alleviate problems. 

And that playground really does need to be highlighted: a comprehensive wooden theme, with a little tree hut and large stumps complementing the standard Giant Triangle Climbing Thingy and New Play Structure With Lots Of Slides that are all the rage these days. And it’s right next to a small water park, which admittedly will lose appeal for anyone over 4 or 5 years old, but there’s few places in the city with a new playground *and* a spray park, and Grandview does both well. 

While the cenotaph has long been a big part of Grandview, the rest of the park has changed considerably over the years, as this photo from the 1970s will attest (Courtesy Vancouver Archives).

There’s solid modern washroom facilities, a small grassy space in the middle, a grand view (see what we did there?) of downtown from the top of the park, and just enough benches and tables if you want to grab a meal from a nearby restaurant. 

It’s not a large enough park or unique enough to be truly amazing, but everything is well executed, with activities for all ages, and it’s the product of a community that has put its values into the space.

 In other words, it’s a great park.

#13: Douglas Park

“Fantastic playground for kids of all ages! It’s a borderline theme park, as far as playground designs go.”

#1 in South Cambie

801 West 22nd Avenue

For Kids

A+



For Adults

B



Design

A-



Atmosphere

B



Final Score

31.90


Douglas Park has the best playground, bar none, of any park in Vancouver, and if you have kids under 10 and live in or around Vancouver, you should go there.

That could be our entire review; it would certainly be blunt and get the point across, but it’s worth espousing on the exact merits of the Douglas Park playground, along with why playgrounds matter and why the one in Douglas sticks out in Vancouver.

First, the merits: the $760,000 playground, opened in 2018, is dominated by a sprawling wooden structure that has suspension bridges, slides, climbing walls and more slides coming out every which way. It feels like something kids might construct in a Lord of the Flies scenario, a defensive battlement, and sits on top of ground that is mixed with woodchips and springy turf paths for accessibility. Complementing all this are a number of springy swing toys, modern swings, a sandy play area, a trampoline, a tiny log house, swings and a number of balancing elements. 

Other Vancouver parks might have a bigger highlight (see: Creekside’s slide), or have an outstanding spray park (see: Granville Island), or have multiple playgrounds (see: Stanley), but none have an individual playground as good as Douglas. Little wonder it’s always packed.

To recap, the playground at Douglas Park: very good!

All this matters because playgrounds are still where kids gravitate to, and are still the easiest way of getting kids outside and exploring a physical environment in a safe way. And the truth is that Vancouver’s suburban municipalities tend to have more standout playgrounds than the city itself: a quick look across the internet will see plenty of playground praise for Richmond’s Terra Nova, Coquitlam’s Queenston, Port Coquilam’s Lions Park and many more east of Boundary and south of the Fraser River, while discussion of Vancouver’s playgrounds drops off quickly after Creekside and Douglas. 

There are plenty of reasons for that — including suburban municipalities trying to attract growing families, or having less space for expansive field-based parks and prioritizing playgrounds instead — but nonetheles, the playground at Douglas rocks. 

And it’s surrounded by a big park with plenty of field space, a basketball court, a cricket pitch, and a solid community centre. Put an A+ playground in the middle of a B park, and this is the score you get. 

Ultimately Douglas is the centrepiece of a neighbourhood that regularly is among the busiest Halloween centres in Vancouver; little wonder the park is just as bustling the other 364 days a year.

#12: New Brighton Park

“Big open spaces with unique waterfront views.”

#2 in Hastings-Sunrise

3201 New Brighton Road

For Kids

B+



For Adults

A



Design

B+



Atmosphere

A



Final Score

31.97


“Here Vancouver Began,” read the plaque at New Brighton Park when it was named a historic site in 1968, one of those bits of quiet Indigenous erasure as the city created a historic narrative around its founding throughout the 20th century. 

But the northeast corner of Vancouver does have plenty of colonial history — where the Hastings Townsite began, the city’s first post office and roads, a historic hotel that gave the area its name. And New Brighton integrates that history into its design, with the port activity on either side and a prominent grain elevator giving full reminder of the fact Vancouver primarily grew because it was a convenient intermediary point for raw materials reaching the rest of the world. 

Even without that historical context, one can appreciate New Brighton as one of the most unique parks in the city from a visual standpoint. And even without those views, New Brighton is still plenty fun. 

There’s the outdoor pool, for one — a large rounded square, with dedicated swimming lanes and more casual areas, only matched by Kits in the city for the size and joy it brings.

And in many ways all of New Brighton is East Vancouver’s version of Kits Beach: less busy, less celebrated, slightly grittier but nearly as beloved. Take the shoreline itself; the beach isn’t really much to write home about, but it will do in a pinch. More importantly, there’s unique views of the eastern section of the North Shore, little walkways to get further out on the water, and a more natural, wetland feeling than most waterfront parks in the city. 

In addition, there’s a large field in the middle, a new dog park right next to the water, and a decent playground, though arguably that’s the only part of New Brighton that feels rather ordinary, with its dated and inaccessible design. And it’s weird position 

Even if it’s not where Vancouver began though, it’s where people can swim and see the shoreline without being swarmed by people. And that is more than enough. 

New Brighton Park as it existed before its massive expansion in the 1960s and 1970s. (Courtesy Vancouver Archives).

#11: Maple Grove Park

“A beautiful old park with old trees in a part of the city most people just drive through. It’s popular with locals, it seems, and rightly so.”

#2 in Kerrisdale

6875 Yew Street

For Kids

A-



For Adults

B+



Design

B+



Atmosphere

A



Final Score

32.07


While so many of Vancouver’s great parks scream their Vancouverness, Maple Grove has a more universal feel, as though it could be dropped in any growing city in the 1950s and suddenly be packed with families enjoying its pleasures. 

There are two particularly noteworthy things about Maple Grove. The first is its pool, and while that might sound like repetition right after New Brighton, there are only five outdoor pools in the city, and Maple Grove’s has a unique shape, more of an elongated liver with little curves everywhere, providing plenty of exploring opportunities for youngsters.

The second is its trees. Or more specifically, the stumps: huge century-old beasts, kept in place in 1913 after the trees were logged, “so that children, years hence, would have an idea of the great stands of timber that once covered Point Grey”, at least so says the plaque. 

These are excellent for small children (or adults who are small children at heart) to run into and create their own little worlds.  But there are also plenty of regular trees — much more than most city parks, where they would likely be removed to create more fields — and they provide a unique separation between each area of the park, along with a quieter section to explore or to picnic in. 

And in general we’re in favour of parks with little forests (you’ll see a lot of them near the top of this list) because aside from providing variety and a connection to nature, they also help create some internal routing through a park, instead of a hodgepodge of activity areas.  

One must also note the washrooms and concession stands, picnic tables and two barbeques on site, a playground (though it’s old and needs an upgrade) and field space for soccer and baseball.

It all adds up to an excellent park for families, a fairly unique park in Vancouver as a whole, and a quiet gem.

Next: Parks #10-1

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