Rating Every Park In Vancouver: #120-111

#120: McBride Park

“It’s an okay park but the exposed location gives it a kind of desolate feel.”

#9 in Kitsilano

3350 West 4th Avenue

For Kids

B



For Adults

B-



Design

C



Atmosphere

C-



Final Score

22.67


The province gave these two city blocks of land along 4th Avenue to the city for park use in 1911 and it was promptly named for the sitting premier, Richard McBride, which is the sort of power move that would never happen today.

But as a park, it’s nice, though lacking in any real flow, owing mostly to the street that bisects that two parts. One side has tennis courts, washrooms and a playground; the tennis courts taking up probably 20% too much space to make tit an interesting walk. The other side has an all-purpose field for soccer and baseball, with lush grass and tall trees blocking some of the noise from 4th. 

The playground is the real highlight, specifically a spinning climbing apparatus that is fairly unique in the city. We regret that it takes multiple strong adults to create any speed, but (insert 700-word rant here about how playgrounds need more STAKES). 

Anyhow it’s a good mix of stuff. Even though you can do more with a park, the things it does are good.

#119: Earles Park

“my fave local park and it’s hardly ever busy so my little one always gets a swing 😁.”

#10 in Renfrew-Collingwood

2801 East 41st Avenue

For Kids

C+



For Adults

C



Design

C+



Atmosphere

C-



Final Score

22.73


Admittedly, Earles is a fairly simple park. 

It’s a large park with a multi-use field on the west side, and a playground on the east side. Between the two is a large hill, which no doubt provides excellent tobogganing 15-30 delays every decade.

The playground is good for 3-6 year olds with a firetruck theme, and there are a good number of tall trees in the middle slope where people can escape the sun and read a good book. 

If all this sounds fine but not particularly inspiring, you’re correct. It’s a solid neighbourhood park though that provides what a community needs, and specifically was the neighbourhood park for one of our rankers when they were growing up.

And if nostalgia tinged our score, doesn’t nostalgia tinge many of our times in a park when we’re older, seeing a hill that reminds us of a snow day and a chance to slide down a hill? 

#118: Tea Swamp Park

“Love the name!”

#9 in Mount Pleasant

266 East 15th Avenue

For Kids

C



For Adults

C+



Design

C



Atmosphere

C+



Final Score

22.75


A small park that opened in 1986, Tea Swamp’s name comes from the wild labrador tea that flourished around the giant bog that used to sit around 17th and Sophia. 

A rudimentary climbing-based playground is on the north side. There’s a lovely sitting area on the south side, full of benches and large rocks and grass, depending on your predilection.

And there’s a bit of a mini-amphitheatre leading out to the street, providing an interesting integration with the neighbourhood, but the concept is half-baked and the curved back to the stage isn’t actually covered (a continued issue in Vancouver parks). 

That’s about it, and the area is a bit too exposed to traffic to truly be a hidden gem.Still a cute space in a small area. 

#117: Charles Park

“Beautiful park but it could have been groomed better.”

#10 in Hastings-Sunrise

3400 Charles Street

For Kids

C-



For Adults

C-



Design

B-



Atmosphere

A



Final Score

23.00


Tucked on the other side of Highway 1 —  in the northern part of the city that is technically still Vancouver, but spiritually Burnaby, this is not up for debate — is a little treasure of a park.

Finding Charles takes some effort, owing to the fact it’s between the highway, an extended alleyway and a cluster of light industrial and commercial outlets. 

Get there though, and you’ll find a nice little walking area with a pond and lazy creek full of ducks. There’s good lighting surrounding the pond, and the bike paths make it a bit more accessible, particularly in the winter time. 

There’s not too much more to it than that, but it’s a unique peaceful park that achieves what it’s trying to do, and must be lovely for those working or living nearby for a quiet lunch spot. 

#116: William Mackie Park

“Kids need better slides and swings.”

#4 in Marpole

1592 West 71st Avenue

For Kids

C



For Adults

C



Design

C+



Atmosphere

B-



Final Score

23.30


Continuing our tour of some of the city’s smaller parks, William Mackie is a small space in a sedate area in the far southwest of the city, between the 70th/Granville intersection and industrial area next to the Fraser River.

Walk down steps to the quasi-sunken area, and you’ll see a couple of tables, a playground, a small field and a small basketball court. The ample tall trees provide lots of shade, and it integrates into the Arbutus Greenway fairly decently. 

At the same time, the playground is both small and in need of serious upgrades, while the green area in the middle is a little too cramped for anything but a small family or friend gathering, or perhaps light play with children. 

Still, there are good bones here, and with the park board committing to an upgrade, (including new playgrounds and a washroom) there’s potential it could become a top-tier tiny park.

#115: Balaclava Park

“A simple green space, two and a half city blocks in size.”

#5 in Dunbar-Southlands

4594 Balaclava Street

For Kids

C+



For Adults

B-



Design

C+



Atmosphere

C-



Final Score

23.33


A big beefy park in the heart of Dunbar, Balaclava’s unique feature is its dark black running track, part of the training grounds for the 1954 British Empire Games (which youngsters will just have to trust was the biggest international sports thing after the Olympics once upon a time).

Aside from the running track, there’s a regular baseball field, a simple play area for toddlers, washroom facilities and an off-leash dog area in the middle. 

Plenty of amenities for plenty of purpose — but the park is so vast and so flat, with so little trees, it’s not particularly a place to explore. And the dog park being right in the middle of the park with minimal separation can create some tension. 

Your mileage will vary, mostly based on how many miles you like running.

#114: Fraserview Golf Course

“Great suburban course.”

#5 in Killarney

7800 Vivian Drive

For Kids

D-



For Adults

C+



Design

A



Atmosphere

B+



Final Score

23.40


Ask people what the best public golf course in the city is, and few will say something other than Fraserview.

Originally built in the 1930s and receiving a substantial upgrade in the 1990s, the course in the southeast corner of the city is defined by the large trees that line virtually every fairway, making each hole self-contained on the property.

There are a few views of Richmond farmland, but otherwise it’s the sort of course with doglegs and ravine crossings and changes in elevation that define the Pacific Northwest style. And the 18th hole, with a dramatic crossing across a gorge to a green in front of the clubhouse, is the stuff of postcards (or nightmares).  

Add in a solid walking trail and holes that are short enough to be playable for just about all skill levels —so long as you drive it straight — and it’s little wonder that it’s next to impossible to find a weekend tee time. 

#113: Volunteer Park

“It is a park made from a property along the waterfront. All of these palaces should have been expropriated 50 years ago.”

#8 in Kitsilano

2855 Point Grey Road


For Kids

D



For Adults

C+



Design

B+



Atmosphere

B



Final Score

23.50


Volunteer Park is easily the best of the Point Grey Road pocket parks, mostly for the fact that it’s simply the biggest, taking up what would be three or four housing lots instead of one or two. 

It also gently slopes down to the water, with a wide area for spectacular views at the bottom. The grass is well maintained in a sort of “gentle meadow” way, and the trees are varied and tall. And car traffic is completely blocked in front of the park, making it a little quieter than the rest of them. 

All of this means it’s usually quite packed, and it’s honestly ridiculous that Vancouver has so many of these tiny pocket parks in one neighbourhood. And planned upgrades for the future include the restoration of the creek that once went through here and adjacent Tatlow Park, which will make a good thing even better.

Not that anyone’s complaining. 

#112: Strathcona Park

“i got a profound sadness as to why it has to be this way.”

#3 in Strathcona

857 Malkin Avenue

For Kids

?



For Adults

?



Design

?



Atmosphere

?



Final Score

23.51


Scoring a park which has been turned into a homeless encampment and one of the city’s biggest hot-button issues is hard.

We know this because each week when we ranked parks in a different neighbourhood, there were some who angrily told us we should focus on drug use in Strathcona instead. 

We know this because when we said the only negative interaction we had visiting any park in the city happened on the city’s west side, a former city councillor who opines often about Strathcona implied this reporter was a creep. 

We know this because when we visited the park for our review, everyone’s scores were wildly different, with different explanations as to why. 

What we *can* say about Strathcona Park is it was the site of the city’s main dump for a number of decades, before community outcry forced the city to move the dump and make it a park. 

We can say the park was originally built on top of the old landfill in the 1940s and called “False Creek Park”, back when people remembered how False Creek originally continued well past Main Street, before it was filled to create industrial and railroad space. 

We can say the park was renamed to Strathcona in the 1970s, had its two community gardens developed in the 80s and 90s, and had extensive upgrades in the 2000s. It’s regularly been a place in flux, it’s always been a centre of the community, it’s been home to controversies over homeless people in the past and will probably be again. 

As for the park? It’s big enough to do just about anything, with basketball and tennis courts, ample field space, washrooms and an older-but-adequate playground.

The real highlight is the two community gardens on the south side: the Strathcona Community Garden to the west is fairly standard but has some lovely sitting areas, but the Cottonwood Community Garden to the east winds around trees, has a variety of different themed areas, and feels completely removed from the city. 

There are so many separate paths and little secrets in both of Strathcona’s community gardens that it seems like shade to merely refer to them as community gardens, to be honest.

Those community gardens are still quite tranquil; the middle of the park is mostly unusable unless you camp there, and our scores reflect that as best we can.

So here it sits, somewhere in the middle, waiting for another revitalization in a story already full of them.

#111: Devonshire Park

“Low key park if you wanna chill and not have tons of people around.”

#2 in Shaughnessy

1250 Devonshire Crescent

For Kids

D



For Adults

B



Design

B-



Atmosphere

B-



Final Score

23.67


A quiet meadow in the southern part of Shaughnessy, Devonshire is a large field with not much else happening. 

But! That meadow is so peaceful, with so many trees and so much green space, that it’s hard to be too upset. The trees and benches provide plenty of options for meetups, but there’s also enough space in the middle for an informal game of soccer or croquet.

And the demographics of Shaughnessy mean it’s considerably less crowded and more quiet than a number of other parks, should you be explicitly seeking such a thing. 

If you believe such a simple park should be given a lesser score, similar to other parks with minimal amenities, that’s your right. It’s still one of the best in its genre, however.

Next: Parks #120-111

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